Python – Generators

If you read the previous chapter, you know that iterators are objects that are regularly used with for loops. In other words, iterators are objects that implement the iteration protocol. A Python generator is a convenient way to implement an iterator. Instead of a class, a generator is a function which returns a value each time the yield keyword is used. Here’s an example of a generator to count the values between two numbers:

def myrange(a, b):
  while a < b:
    yield a
    a += 1
a = myrange(2, 4) # call the generator function which returns an object
print (next(a)) # iterate through items using next
print (next(a))
Output

2 3

Like iterators, generators can be used with the for loop:

def myrange(a, b):
    while a < b:
     yield a
      a += 1
for value in myrange(1, 4):
  print(value)
Output

1 2 3

Under the hood, generators behave similarly to iterators. As can be seen in the example below, uncommenting the line 9 should give an error:

Why error?

Since on line 6, the range is defined from 1 to 3, so generating the next number will give an error.

def myrange(a, b):
    while a < b:
      yield a
      a += 1
seq = myrange(1,3)
print(next(seq))
print(next(seq)) 
##next(seq)
Output

0 1 2

The interesting thing about generators is the yield keyword. The yield keyword works much like the return keyword, but—unlike return—it allows the function to eventually resume its execution. In other words, each time the next value of a generator is needed, Python wakes up the function and resumes its execution from the Yield line as if the function had never exited.

Generator functions can use other functions inside. For instance, it is very common to use the range function to iterate over a sequence of numbers:

def squares(n):
  for value in range(n):
    yield value * value
sqr = squares(8)
print(next(sqr))
print(next(sqr))
print(next(sqr))
Output

0 1 4

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.